Clientserver Computing Has Become The Model For New Information Architecture This Technology Will Take Enterprise Wide Comput

Client/Server computing has become the model for new information architecture. This technology will take enterprise wide computing into the 21st century. Computing power has rapidly become distributed and interconnected throughout many organizations through networks of all types of computers. Networked computer systems are taking the form of client/server computing. With client/server computing, end users can handle a broad range of information processing tasks.

This included data entry, inquiry response, updating databases, and providing decision support. How do the client/server systems at Helene Curtis illustrate the benefits of client/server computing? The client/server system allows the sales reps the ability to tap into the database to retrieve data about product sales and promotions. The reps cans tap into the systems with their palmpads. The palmpad are hand held computers linking the reps to the company’s database system. With the information retrieved, the reps can give store managers fact based advice on products, promotions, and fill orders. The immediate feedback informs the reps where and which products are selling best and the promotion used to sell. The palmpad is way to maintain good relations with retailers, who pass the service to the customers. Client/Server computing allows many users to share common data resources, including files and databases as well as computer storage and printers. Sharing data and information eliminates the need for personal management of data and/or peripheral devices.

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Finally, client/server computing allows the integration of geographically distributed users and computing resources into a cohesive computer and communication environment (Senn, 1995, p. 404). The palmpads let the field sales reps visit, on average, one more store a day. How might this be a competitive advantage for Helene Curtis? Retailers require and expect special services from manufacturers. The palmpad allows reps to visit the store and act as consultants and account managers.

The rep’s palmpads, enable the reps to retrieve sales data, track inventory, and link stores. The information will aid the reps in determining manufacture discounts to retailers. Which enables the retailers to hold sales and price cut to pull in the price conscious consumers. Specific information requested by the reps is made available. The server processes database requests and the client takes the results and works with them.

Thus, with client/server computing, as much of the processing as possible is performed on the server before the requested data and information are transmitted to the client. This means specific information, not complete files or large sections of databases, are transmitted to the client (Senn, 1995, p. 404). Many stock analysts feel that Helene Curtis is well positioned for future growth. As evidence, they cite the company’s ongoing introduction of new, higher-priced brands and its investment in the information systems needed to provide good retail service.

What might these predictions mean for Helene Curtis’s competitors? Helene Curtis competitors need to invest in an information system. Potential investors are looking not only for a good product, but also an information system that will aid in providing for retail service. The information system will allow companies to track of sales data of its competitors. Also, the system will increase productivity. Companies will be able to compete with new products or price discounts, or whatever else their competitors are handing out.

The information has to be easily accessible to employees and provide quick feedback. All of this means faster access to data and information, better service for customers, quicker responses to changes in the business environment, more efficient business power, fewer errors, and in general, higher levels of productivity (Senn, 1995, p. 404). Client/Server technology promises many things to many people: to end users, easier access to corporate and external data; to managers, dramatically lower costs for processing; to programmers, reduced maintenance; to corporate planners, and infrastructure that enables business processes to be reengineered for strategic benefits. Whether client/server lives up to these promises will depend in large part on how carefully it is planned for, and how intelligently policies are put forth to manage it.

Bibliography Client/Server computing has become the model for new information architecture. This technology will take enterprise wide computing into the 21st century. Computing power has rapidly become distributed and interconnected throughout many organizations through networks of all types of computers. Networked computer systems are taking the form of client/server computing. With client/server computing, end users can handle a broad range of information processing tasks.

This included data entry, inquiry response, updating databases, and providing decision support. How do the client/server systems at Helene Curtis illustrate the benefits of client/server computing? The client/server system allows the sales reps the ability to tap into the database to retrieve data about product sales and promotions. The reps cans tap into the systems with their palmpads. The palmpad are hand held computers linking the reps to the company’s database system. With the information retrieved, the reps can give store managers fact based advice on products, promotions, and fill orders. The immediate feedback informs the reps where and which products are selling best and the promotion used to sell. The palmpad is way to maintain good relations with retailers, who pass the service to the customers. Client/Server computing allows many users to share common data resources, including files and databases as well as computer storage and printers. Sharing data and information eliminates the need for personal management of data and/or peripheral devices.

Finally, client/server computing allows the integration of geographically distributed users and computing resources into a cohesive computer and communication environment (Senn, 1995, p. 404). The palmpads let the field sales reps visit, on average, one more store a day. How might this be a competitive advantage for Helene Curtis? Retailers require and expect special services from manufacturers. The palmpad allows reps to visit the store and act as consultants and account managers.

The rep’s palmpads, enable the reps to retrieve sales data, track inventory, and link stores. The information will aid the reps in determining manufacture discounts to retailers. Which enables the retailers to hold sales and price cut to pull in the price conscious consumers. Specific information requested by the reps is made available. The server processes database requests and the client takes the results and works with them.

Thus, with client/server computing, as much of the processing as possible is performed on the server before the requested data and information are transmitted to the client. This means specific information, not complete files or large sections of databases, are transmitted to the client (Senn, 1995, p. 404). Many stock analysts feel that Helene Curtis is well positioned for future growth. As evidence, they cite the company’s ongoing introduction of new, higher-priced brands and its investment in the information systems needed to provide good retail service.

What might these predictions mean for Helene Curtis’s competitors? Helene Curtis competitors need to invest in an information system. Potential investors are looking not only for a good product, but also an information system that will aid in providing for retail service. The information system will allow companies to track of sales data of its competitors. Also, the system will increase productivity. Companies will be able to compete with new products or price discounts, or whatever else their competitors are handing out.

The information has to be easily accessible to employees and provide quick feedback. All of this means faster access to data and information, better service for customers, quicker responses to changes in the business environment, more efficient business power, fewer errors, and in general, higher levels of productivity (Senn, 1995, p. 404). Client/Server technology promises many things to many people: to end users, easier access to corporate and external data; to managers, dramatically lower costs for processing; to programmers, reduced maintenance; to corporate planners, and infrastructure that enables business processes to be reengineered for strategic benefits. Whether client/server lives up to these promises will depend in large part on how carefully it is planned for, and how intelligently policies are put forth to manage it.