Web Class Room

.. .1 More HTML The more familiar you become with HTML, the more you will be able to enhance your course’s web site. This can be a good thing, and it can also be not so good. Adding components and extra “bells and whistles” to your web site should be done as a conscious choice to support your educational objectives and not just because the “bells and whistles” are there. 7.1.1.2.2 CGI Stands for Common Gateway Interface and is the coding that allows the information collected from forms on webs sites to be manipulated.

This can be as simple as allowing students to send specific assignments to you, or can be as elaborate as on-line registration. 7.2 Components of the Web Course Every Web-delivered course will have a number of components. These will vary depending upon your needs, your style and the degree of interactivity in the course. There are some components that should be part of your site, in order to make the course appealing to your customer. I feel that some components of a web-based course are essential and others are optional.

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7.2.1 Essential Components These can be divided into static and dynamic. 7.2.1.1 Static Components These components change very little. They can be put on your web site and only updated as needed. 7.2.1.1.1 The Course Description This will often come directly from your University calendar. 7.2.1.1.2 The Professor This can be as informal or as formal as you like. What kind of first impression do you wish to make? How much do you wish to add? Do you wish to link to your own personal Web site (if you have one)? 7.2.1.1.3 Prerequisites Again, this can often come from your university calendar.

It is always a good point to specify any particular computing hardware, software or skills that will be required for students to be able to take your course. 7.2.1.1.4 The Text Here is a nice place to put a scanned cover of the text – along with the ISBN, the publisher and all of the information needed for your potential students to acquire this text. Here is a good place to put a link to your institute’s bookstore – assuming it has a web site. 7.2.1.1.5 Communications This is where you put as much information as you can about how students can reach you. Will you have office hours? Virtual office hours? Can they reach you via Email? How do they reach each other? Is there a listserv, a secure server? 7.2.1.1.6 Grading Students all seem to want to know what they have to do to get a mark.

This is a good place to tell them about assignments, quizzes, mid-terms and finals, and any other expectations you have of them. 7.2.1.2 Dynamic Components These components may change often. They might be updated, or supplemented once a week or every few days. 7.2.1.2.1 Bulletin Board This gets used much more in the first part of the class. As the class gets “into it” this seems to be used less frequently.

7.2.1.2.2 Assignments These can be placed on the web site before the class begins for all assignments, or can become readable at given times or as new assignments are given. 7.2.1.2.3 Communications Options These are the actual components of the web site that allow interactivity in the course. The real power of the WWW is global communication. And this is what makes web-based courses so exciting. Your course’s communications may include any number of the following: 7.2.1.2.4 Closed Listservs These use standard Email to allow all members of the class to send and receive messages from any other member of the class, including the instructor.

Messages are automatically sent to all of the individual’s personal Email addresses. 7.2.1.2.5 Web Forums These are places where people can interact. Student-to-student, student-to-teacher and teacher-to-student or teacher to the entire class. These are sections on the web that students go to and are able to read messages and participate in on-line, asynchronous’conversations.’ 7.2.1.2.6 Interactive ‘real time’ two-way audio or video There are numerous pieces of software available now that allow desktop two-way video and audio. These tend to require very high bandwidth, and because they are’real-time’ they require the participating parties to all be on the web at the same time. 7.2.1.2.7 Marks This is a place where your marking scheme can be listed. It is also a place where you can post marks or assignments in (if you have a secure server that only your class can access). 7.2.1.2.8 Class Notes As each week progresses, or just prior to each week’s work, students may need to have the equivalent of lecture notes to supplement what is covered in the text book, or what has been assigned on the web. Some web software will allow you to put the all the notes on the web site – and as certain dates arrive, students then have access to the notes. 7.2.2 Optional Components These may be essential, depending upon your requirements.

7.2.2.1 Audio clips These may be as sound files (.WAV or .AU), audio streaming (Real Audio, Soundstream, Shockwave) or MIDI files. 7.2.2.2 Animations These may be as animated .GIFs, QuickTime, Shockwave or Java applications. 7.2.2.3 Quizzes, especially “self-correcting” quizzes These may be as part of a web educational software (WebCT) or can be developed by yourself or your institution. 7.2.2.4 Case studies These may be as included as text pages or may be referenced to other sites. This is one area where copyright can really come into play.

The cost of clearing copyright on a set of Harvard business case studies can be out of the question. 7.2.2.5 Video clips These may be as QuickTime video or may be done with the new Real Video that allows real-time video streaming. 7.2.2.6 Web Database Sites These will allow you to maintain and provide access to databases over the web. 7.2.2.7 Web Tutoring Sessions These may be as simple as step-by-step instructions for any topic with branching provided to additional sites. They can also be we intelligent tutorials with on-line interactive testing. 7.3 Points to Ponder 7.3.1 Open Server An “open server” will allow anyone, anywhere on the web to access your information. 7.3.2 Secure Server A “secure server” will only allow persons with some type of authorization code to access your information.

8.0 RESOURCES (This list does not constitute an endorsement on anyone’s part. These resources are a jumping off points to help you get your course on the web.) Please do not overlook the many resources on your own campus. 8.1 My resources page This site has links to courses, resources, helper sites that aid you in choosing which type and format of media to use, sites that check your HTML for errors or idiosyncrasies, and much more. http://www.unb.ca/web/wwwdev/resources.html 8.2 Conferences, on-line or face-to-face NAWeb ’98 – The Virtual Campus (October 3-6, 1998). This international conference is in its fourth year. It is intended solely for those developing courseware for delivery on the WWW or for those delivering courseware over the WWW. http://www.unb.ca/web/wwwdev/naweb98/ 8.3 Books, listservs and associations Badrul Khan’s Web-Based Instruction (Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Educational Technology Publications, 1997) is quite good.

I host the WWWDEV listserv. This listserv hosts the NAWeb conferences, and has 1400 members from around the world – developing for delivery over the WWW or actually delivering courseware over the WWW. http://www.unb.ca/web/wwwdev/ The DEOSNEWS listserv is involved in all aspects of distance education. You can join that one by sending this message SUBSCRIBE DEOSNEWS your name to This is who and what they are: DEOS-L is a service provided to the Distance Education community by The American Center for the Study of Distance Education, The Pennsylvania State University. Opinions expressed are those of DEOS-L subscribers, and do not constitute endorsement of any opinion, product, or service by ACSDE or Penn State. The Canadian Association for Distance Education (CADE) can often help http://www.cade-aced.ca/ The Association for Media and Technology in Education – Canada (AMTEC) is another favorite of mine. http://www.camosun.bc.ca/~amtec/ Use every and any resource you can.

Join groups for support, and support others in similar projects. This is a rapidly emerging field, and it is evolving and growing just as fast as it is emerging. 8.4 Other Here is where you add ideas you pick up at the conference. Bibliography This site has links to courses, resources, helper sites that aid you in choosing which type and format of media to use, sites that check your HTML for errors or idiosyncrasies, and much more. http://www.unb.ca/web/wwwdev/resources.html 8.2 Conferences, on-line or face-to-face NAWeb ’98 – The Virtual Campus (October 3-6, 1998). This international conference is in its fourth year.

It is intended solely for those developing courseware for delivery on the WWW or for those delivering courseware over the WWW. http://www.unb.ca/web/wwwdev/naweb98/ 8.3 Books, listservs and associations Badrul Khan’s Web-Based Instruction (Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Educational Technology Publications, 1997) is quite good. I host the WWWDEV listserv. This listserv hosts the NAWeb conferences, and has 1400 members from around the world – developing for delivery over the WWW or actually delivering courseware over the WWW. http://www.unb.ca/web/wwwdev/ The DEOSNEWS listserv is involved in all aspects of distance education. You can join that one by sending this message SUBSCRIBE DEOSNEWS your name to This is who and what they are: DEOS-L is a service provided to the Distance Education community by The American Center for the Study of Distance Education, The Pennsylvania State University. Opinions expressed are those of DEOS-L subscribers, and do not constitute endorsement of any opinion, product, or service by ACSDE or Penn State.

The Canadian Association for Distance Education (CADE) can often help http://www.cade-aced.ca/ The Association for Media and Technology in Education – Canada (AMTEC) is another favorite of mine. http://www.camosun.bc.ca/~amtec/ Use every and any resource you can. Join groups for support, and support others in similar projects. This is a rapidly emerging field, and it is evolving and growing just as fast as it is emerging. 8.4 Other Here is where you add ideas you pick up at the conference.